In Pope Francis’ apostolic exhortation Gaudete et Exsultate (Rejoice and Be Glad), he enjoins us to embark on our Christian journey of holiness by embracing the ordinariness of everyday. Throughout his exhortation, Pope Francis calls out more than 40 saints who can assist us on our mission of Christian faith, and to teach us how to rejoice and be glad in all of life’s challenges, mysteries, and joys.

During the 34 weeks of Ordinary Time, we will introduce you to some of the saints mentioned in Pope Francis’ apostolic exhortation. #OrdinarySaints for #OrdinaryTime #HolyOrdinary


St. Francis of Assisi – #46, #100, #127
Feast Day October 4

#46 When St. Francis of Assisi saw that some of his disciples were engaged in teaching, he wanted to avoid the temptation to Gnosticism. He wrote to St. Anthony of Padua: “I am pleased that you teach sacred theology to the brothers, provided that … you do not extinguish the spirit of prayer and devotion during study of this kind.” Francis recognized the temptation to turn the Christian experience into a set of intellectual exercises that distance us from the freshness of the Gospel.

#127 With the love of a father, God tells us: “My son, treat yourself well… Do not deprive yourself of a happy day.” He wants us to be positive, grateful, and uncomplicated: “In the day of prosperity, be joyful… God created human beings straightforward, but they have devised many schemes.” Whatever the case, we should remain resilient and imitate St. Paul: “I have learned to be content with what I have.” St. Francis of Assisi lived by this; he  could be overwhelmed with gratitude before a piece of hard bread, or joyfully praise God imply for the breeze that caressed his face.”

St. Francis of Assisi is known for many things – his love for God’s creation, his love for the Eucharist, arranging the first nativity scene, and, of course, the founding of the Franciscan Friars. Perhaps lesser known is St. Francis’ desire to end the Crusades and his receiving the stigmata, making him the first person in Christian tradition to bear the wounds of Christ’s Passion.

There is much to be learned about and from St. Francis.

https://www.franciscanmedia.org/saint-francis-of-assisi/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_of_Assisi